The Aga Khan Schools home
The Aga Khan High School, KampalaFacilitiesCurriculumThe Aga Khan High School, KampalaThe Aga Khan High School, Kampala

Quick Links

AKES brochure

School calendar (PDF)

Admissions

Contact us

Schools worldwide

Other Schools

The Aga Khan Nursery School, Makerere

Schools in Uganda

 
 

A great school,
"will educate its students not merely to be personally successful but also to use their gifts to build their communities and enhance the common good to levels beyond our dreams."

His Highness
The Aga Khan

Introduction

Established in 1959 in Old Kampala, the Aga Khan High School, Kampala has distinguished itself by the quality of its staff and students, under its headmaster, Mr Brendan McCourt. Seen as the first multicultural school in Uganda, the present day school continues to play a unique educational role in the country.


The Aga Khan High School, KampalaThe Aga Khan Schools strive to create a harmonious balance between academic demands, sporting and cultural activities and community life. Students from 23 nations study in the International General Certificate of Education (IGCSE); the International Baccalaureate (from 2005); the national Uganda Certificate of Education (UCE), and Uganda Advanced Certificate of Education (UACE).

The School is part of the Aga Khan Education Services (AKES). AKES has a long tradition of leadership in educational development. The foundations of the present system were laid by Sir Sultan Mohamed Shah, Aga Khan III, under whose guidance over 200 schools were established during the first half of the 20th century, the first of them in 1905 in Zanzibar, Gwadur in Pakistan and Mundra in India. Since the creation of Aga Khan Education Service companies in the 1970s, the schools have been centrally administered and managed.

The Aga Khan Schools strive to create a harmonious balance between academic demands, sporting and cultural activities and community life. They challenge pupils to be intellectually inquisitive and socially conscious. The Schools believe that while what students know is important, the true measure of a student's education is the ability to analyse what they do not know.

Return to top of page